Student Brings Panel of AIDS Quilt to UNC

Elizabeth Trefney and her father John will see Jeremy Trefney's panel for the first time when it comes to campus in January.

Elizabeth Trefney and her father John will see Jeremy Trefney’s panel for the first time when it comes to campus in January.

As a freshman at UNC, Elizabeth Trefney remembers seeing a flyer publicizing a class about HIV/AIDS. The semester-long course is offered each spring by the UNC Center for AIDS Research (CFAR) and is open to all students. Past classes have focused on how the virus impacts the immune system, currently available treatments and the latest prevention strategies.

For Trefney, the course material felt personal. Her uncle, Jeremy, died of AIDS in 1988. She recently learned her uncle had a panel in the AIDS Memorial Quilt. The quilt began in 1987 as a way of celebrating the lives of those lost to HIV. Trefney’s father, John, says Jeremy’s friends created his panel, which is number 766. There are now more than 48,000 3-by-6-foot panels.

Taking the HIV/AIDS course inspired Elizabeth Trefney to action. She asked UNC’s Executive Vice Provost Ron Strauss, DMD, PhD, who also organizes the HIV/AIDS course, if bringing the quilt to campus was a possibility. Strauss said it was feasible and encouraged Trefney to reach out to the Names Project Foundation in Atlanta, which is the custodian of the AIDS Memorial Quilt.

“At first, I just requested bringing a section of the quilt to campus,” Trefney says. “Then I learned I could request my uncle’s panel. It will be the first time anyone in my family has seen it.”

The panel will be on display in the Carolina Student Union’s West Lounge from Jan. 10-31, 2018. There will be a special presentation where attendees will be asked to shine lights from their cell phones on the quilt in an act of unity on Wednesday, Jan. 24, from 7-8 p.m.

An avid musician, Jeremy Trefney's panel of the AIDS Quilt illustrates his passion for the piano.

An avid musician, Jeremy Trefney’s panel of the AIDS Quilt illustrates his passion for the piano.

Surrounded by Love
Jeremy Trefney worked as a marketing professional by day and played music at night in Cleveland. John Trefney remembers listening to his older brother play the clarinet, saxophone and piano.

“Elizabeth plays the piano and I feel like a piece of him is still with us when she plays,” Trefney says.

John Trefney was a high school sophomore when Jeremy told the family he was gay.

“I had a tough time accepting that. It took me about six months to come to terms with it,” Trefney says. “But the experience brought us closer. And when Jeremy became sick and told us he had AIDS, we embraced him. That was not the case for everyone who was diagnosed at that time. My father would go to the hospital every day. I remember him rubbing my brother’s feet. But some people never had any visitors and they died alone.”

Jeremy Trefney died at the age of 31 in 1988. No treatments for the virus existed at that time. The field has come a long way in the past 30 years with UNC leading major discoveries in treatment, prevention and cure research.

Elizabeth Trefney never met her uncle. She and her father hope bringing his panel to UNC will put a face to the virus that still affects nearly 37 million people worldwide.

“Throughout his fight with AIDS, my brother was always surrounded by love,” John Trefney says. “We hope people will visit his panel while it is on campus, and feel that sense of love and acceptance.”

Biostatistics Core presents work at Summer Conferences

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Ilana Trumble from the CFAR Biostatistics Core presented a poster at the Collaboratory of AIDS Researchers for Eradication (CARE) Annual Meeting in June 2017, together with Yinyan Xu. This work from the Goonetilleke Lab (G lab) is entitled “Longitudinal assessment of baseline variation in HIV-1 specific T cell responses in HIV-1 infected, durably suppressed individuals.” For more information on the G lab, click here.

Wang Cheng Poster

Wang Cheng, visiting scholar from UNC Project China, is researching the generalizability of online randomized control trials. His work was presented at the Atlantic Causal Inference Conference, Chapel Hill, NC, May 2017. This work was a joint collaboration between UNC Project China, the Chinese Center for Disease Control (C-CDC), and the UNC CFAR Biostatistics Core. For more information about UNC Project China, click here.

10th Annual InWomen’s Conference

The 10th annual conference on new and significant findings about the consequences of substance use, abuse, and risk behaviors, hosted by the International Women’s and Children’s Health and Gender Group. The group aims to identify and promote innovative research that helps to empower women across the lifespan, foster gender-based analyses in research, and promote the benefits of prevention, intervention, and treatment.

Abstracts are now being accepted!

Abstracts with a focus or component on women, children, youth, LGBT+ individuals, and/or gender differences in areas pertaining to substance use will be considered.

Submission Deadline: January 06, 2017 at 11:59 PM EST
Abstract and Travel Award Notifications will be sent by: February 24, 2017
Visa Letters Issued: February 24 – March 24, 2017

Click here for the Abstract Submission Form.

2nd Annual CFAR HIV in the Southeast Workshop

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In the decades since the first AIDS cases were reported in Los Angeles and New York City in 1981, the epicenter of the nation’s HIV epidemic has shifted from urban centers along the coasts to the 16 states and District of Columbia that make up the South. The South now experiences the greatest burden of HIV infection, illness, and deaths of any U.S. region, and lags behind in providing quality HIV prevention and care to its citizens.

Southern states today account for an estimated 44 percent of all people living with an HIV diagnosis in the U.S., despite having only about one-third (37%) of the overall U.S. population. Eight of the 10 states with the highest rates of new HIV diagnoses are in the South, as are the 10 metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) with the highest rates (CDC HIV Surveillance Report, 2014). Diagnosis rates for people in the South are higher than for Americans overall: In 2010, the region had the highest rates of HIV and AIDS diagnoses in the country, as well as the highest number of people living with HIV compared to all other regions (SAS Report, 2015).

2017 marked the second year of the CFAR HIV in the Southeast Workshop, at gathering of researchers and community organizers from CFARs across the country. This year’s event was held in the Cal Turner Family Center at Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee on March 24, 2017.  The Tennessee CFAR hosted the workshop.

CFAR investigators and staff, along with public health workers and community representatives, collaboratively addressed the nature of the shifting HIV epidemic at the workshop. Discussions and panels identified shared resources and strategies to combat the epidemic, ways to engage the community and methods to influence public health policy to better serve people living with or at risk for HIV in the Southeast. Attendees had the opportunity to hear plenary speakers present on NIH priorities and initiatives relevant to HIV/AIDS in the South, necessary components for collaboration between health departments and CFARs, and use of molecular surveillance data to identify clusters of HIV infection.

The UNC CFAR was well-represented in panel discussions as leaders in the field: Erika Samoff  spoke on the panel “Working with Health Departments, including Rapid HIV Transmission Networks/Phylogenetics”,  Heidi Swygard spoke on the panel “PrEP Implementation, Linkage, Retention, and Rapid ART Initiation”, Bill Zule shared on the panel “HIV and the Opioid Epidemic”, and Caressa White led a discussion on “Effective Approaches to Community Engagement”. Following the panel discussions, attendees joined in conversation about priorities and action items for the future.

Workshop planners are now collecting information from participants in the Southeast CFAR Workshops (Atlanta 2016 and/or Nashville 2017) to assist all participating CFARs, justify supplemental funding for a potential third workshop, and maintain momentum for the organization. The work to address the epidemic in the Southeast is essential to the health of people in the region and to our nation’s long-term goal of ending the epidemic. – Caressa White, SCEED Office Director

UNC CFAR Spring 2017 Networking Event

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Congressman David Price

On May 8, 2017, the UNC CFAR Social and Behavioral Sciences Research Core hosted the Spring 2017 Networking Event. The theme of this month’s event was “HIV Research that Reaches Policymakers: Part I with Congressman David Price D-NC-04”.

David Price represents North Carolina’s Fourth District – a rapidly growing, research-and-education-focused district that includes parts of Orange, Durham, and Wake counties. He received his undergraduate degree at UNC-Chapel Hill and went to Yale University to earn a Bachelor of Divinity and Ph.D. in Political Science. Before he began serving in Congress in 1987, Price was a Professor of Political Science and Public Policy at Duke University. He is the author of four books on Congress and the American political system. Price currently serves on the House Appropriations Committee and is the ranking member of the Transportation, Housing and Urban Development Appropriations Subcommittee. He is also a member of the Appropriations subcommittees covering homeland security, State Department, and foreign operations funding.

Congressman Price addresses attendees at the Networking Event

Congressman Price addresses attendees at the Networking Event

Congressman Price shared his perspective on how researchers can best focus their outreach efforts to inform policy makers about their research findings and shared personal examples of how he used research to inform policy.  He also shared the importance of having a broad viewpoint on health issues and working as a coalition to advocate for funding.

Following the talk, Dr. Ronald Strauss, Administrative Core Consultant for the UNC CFAR, moderated a question & answer session with Congressman Price and attendees. Attendees posed questions around the future of HIV research and prevention, with a specific focus on PrEP and HIV in the South. Congressman Price emphasized the importance of community partnerships and well-developed grassroots outreach efforts. Price discussed the value of seeking funding through the ACA to promote research and further inquiry in the field of health maintenance, diagnosis and wellness. A strong emphasis was placed on developing positive working relationships with community health centers, and Price encouraged attendees to think strategically about how we support the work of those combatting health challenges outside of the HIV/AIDS field. Congressman Price articulated that the most lasting impact is made when researchers work cooperatively to address health disparities. He encouraged attendees to connect with national advocacy groups like the Non-Defense Discretionary (NDD) United, an alliance of stakeholders from across the non-defense sectors, to call for a balanced approach to deficit reduction.

Stay tuned for Part 2 of this event with Congressman Price in the fall!

New HIV Reservoir Identified by UNC Team

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HIV cure research to date has focused on clearing the virus from T cells, a type of white blood cell that is an essential part of the immune system. Yet investigators in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine have found the virus persists in HIV-infected macrophages. Macrophages are large white blood cells found in tissues throughout the body including the liver, lung, bone marrow and brain. The discovery of this additional viral reservoir has significant implications for HIV cure research. These findings were published in Nature Medicine on Monday, April 17.

“These results are paradigm changing because they demonstrate that cells other than T cells can serve as a reservoir for HIV,” said Jenna Honeycutt, Ph.D., lead-author and postdoctoral research associate in the UNC Division of Infectious Diseases. “The fact that HIV-infected macrophages can persist means that any possible therapeutic intervention to eradicate HIV might have to target two very different types of cells.”

Last spring, this laboratory lead by J. Victor Garcia, Ph. D., professor of medicine, microbiology and immunology at UNC School of Medicine, demonstrated the ability of tissue macrophages to support HIV replication in vivo in the total absence of human T cells. But how macrophages would respond to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and whether macrophages represented a reservoir for HIV after treatment were unknown.

Macrophages are myeloid lineage cells that have been implicated in HIV pathogenesis and in the trafficking of virus into the brain. Using a humanized myeloid-only mouse (MoM) model devoid of T cells, Garcia and his team showed that ART strongly suppresses HIV replication in tissue macrophages. Yet when HIV treatment was interrupted, viral rebound was observed in one third of the animals. This is consistent with the establishment of persistent infection in tissue macrophages.

“This is the first report demonstrating that tissue macrophages can be infected and that they respond to antiretroviral therapy,” Honeycutt said. “In addition, we show that productively infected macrophages can persist despite ART; and most importantly, that they can reinitiate and sustain infection upon therapy interruption even in the absence of T cells – the major target of HIV infection.”

Now that Garcia and his team know HIV persists in macrophages, the next step will be to determine what regulates HIV persistence in tissue macrophages, where in the body persistently infected macrophages reside during HIV treatment and how macrophages respond to possible therapeutic interventions aimed at eradicating HIV from the body.

The UNC School of Medicine team collaborated with scientists in UNC’s Department of Biostatistics, the Theoretical Division at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System, and the Departments of Medicine and Pathology at the University of California at San Diego. This study was funded by the National Institute of Mental Health and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the U.S. National Institutes of Health.

Self-Swabbing Increases STD Screens

 

The number of cases of syphilis, chlamydia and gonorrhea increased from 2014 to 2015 in North Carolina. This prompted a multidisciplinary group in the UNC Infectious Diseases Clinic to introduce several interventions, including self-swabbing, to screen more patients for sexually transmitted diseases.

The ID Clinic inside the NC Memorial Hospital on Carolina’s campus is one of a few clinics in the state giving patients the option to screen themselves for chlamydia and gonorrhea. Self-swabbing is one of a handful of interventions created by a multidisciplinary quality improvement group including the clinic’s nurses, social workers, a certified medical assistant and a provider.

“Sex is normal and healthy,” says Ellen McAngus, LCSWA, a social work practitioner in the ID Clinic. “But we need to give our patients the right tools to protect themselves and their partners.”

UNC ID Clinic providers manage the care for 1,800 people living with HIV. In 2015, clinic nurse Anita Holt, RN, and Associate Clinic Director Amy Heine, FNP, noticed screening rates for syphilis in patients living with HIV were down, despite there being an increase in syphilis cases in North Carolina. In fact, the number of syphilis cases in the state increased by 64 percent between 2014 and 2015, according to the NC Department of Health and Human Services.

Through photos, an infographic and a video, learn more about the team’s progress in educating their patients about sexual health.

UNC to Test Injectable Long-Acting Implant to Prevent HIV

Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have received a three-year, $1.8 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop a new implantable drug delivery system for long-lasting HIV-prevention.

Scientists in the UNC School of Medicine’s Division of Infectious Diseases and the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy are developing an injectable drug delivery system that forms an implant that steadily releases anti-HIV medication over long periods of time.

The injectable formulation includes an anti-HIV drug, a polymer and a solvent. The three-compound liquid will solidify once injected under the skin. As the polymer slowly degrades, the drug is released. Efficacy of the new formulation to prevent HIV transmission will be evaluated using state of the art pre-clinical models developed at UNC.

Currently, a once-daily pill exists to prevent HIV infection. However, adherence to this daily regimen can be challenging for some people.

“This long-acting injectable formulation could provide a discrete and efficient method to protect against HIV infection and improve adherence, which is one of the major challenges of oral pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP,” said Rahima Benhabbour, Ph.D., assistant professor in the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy and one of the study’s co-principal investigators. “The formulation is adaptable to a number of drugs alone or in combination and can be fine tuned to meet a targeted release regimen.”

Read more here..

SYNChronicity 2017: The National Conference for HIV, HCV, and LGBT Health

SYNChronicity (or SYNC 2017) is HealthHIV’s national conference addressing HIV and HCV disease prevention, care and treatment. With the National Coalition for LGBT Health co-hosting SYNC 2017, the agenda is expanded to include LGBT health. The conference is titled SYNChronicity because the approach is to SYNC various audiences with a variety of topics with the intended outcome of advancing HIV, HCV and LGBT health.

Additionally, new track and institutes have been added to the 2017 Sync Agenda, including the Black Women’s Health Track and PrEP Preamble.

PrEP Preamble:
SYNCing CROI Data with PrEP Implementation
Sunday, April 23, 2017, 6:30 PM – 8:30 PM

HealthHIV is hosting the PrEP Preamble: SYNCing CROI Data with PrEP Implementation on Sunday, April 23 from 6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.

SYNC 2017 registration is not required to attend this event; all are invited to attend, including:
• Prescribing Providers (NP, PA, DO, MD);
• PrEP Advocates;
• Potential or Current PrEP Consumers;
• Health Department Staff; and
• Health Center Personnel

Please visit the conference website for more information. Click here to register. 

Summer Internship in CFAR Biostatistics Core – Application Deadline April 24

Summer 2017 Internship Opportunity at the UNC Center for AIDS Research

Do you want to use math to help the fight against HIV/AIDS?

The Biostatistics Core at UNC Center for AIDS Research is seeking a summer undergraduate intern, paid $11 to 14/hour, 10-20 hours per week. The Core helps design studies, analyze data and advance statistics methods for HIV research, at UNC and internationally. As a summer intern, you will have the opportunity to aid in statistical analysis and gain valuable experience in multidisciplinary research. Students majoring in math, statistics, computer science, or another quantitative research field are invited to apply. If you have R-project, SAS or STATA coding experience let us know! To learn more about our research, go to http://unccfar.org/ (Cores – Biostatistics).

Students from underrepresented minorities majoring in any of the above fields are highly encouraged to apply.

Application deadline: Mon April 24, 2017

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Eligible Candidates:

-Are currently enrolled undergraduate students curious about a career in biostatistics or medical research

-Have a keen interest in mathematics, statistics, and/or programming

-Are computer savvy, abstract thinkers with math training through Calculus 1

-Want to learn more about HIV/AIDS and are able to meet in person on UNC main campus

To apply, please send your resume, availability, and a list of 2 or more references (teachers or people you have worked with) to Katie Mollan: kmollan@unc.edu

If you have questions, please contact us via email.