CFAR represented at World AIDS Day Events Around the Triangle

Dr. David Wohl speaks on HIV Therapy at the 2016 Red Tie Affair

World AIDS Day, started in 1988, is an opportunity for people worldwide to unite in the fight against HIV, increase awareness, combat stigma, and improve education. Each year, the UNC Center for AIDS Research and the UNC Institute for Global Health and Infectious Diseases host a World AIDS Day Symposium featuring presentations by UNC faculty members, expert research and medical professionals, and panel discussions.

This year, morning session keynote speaker Michael Mugavero, MD, MHSc, from the University of Alabama spoke on “Ending AIDS in Alabama”. The afternoon session keynote speaker Elizabeth Connick, MD, University of Arizona, spoke on “The Role of the B Cell Follicular Sanctuary in HIV Immunopathogenesis”.

Attendees enjoyed a lively panel discussion on Access to HIV Care and presentations on a wide variety of relevant topics to the field, including “HIV Epidemiology” from Erica Samoff, PhD, MPH, North Carolina Division of Public Health and “The Role of the Immune Response in Curing HIV” from Nilu Goonetilleke, PhD, UNC Chapel Hill. Allison Matthews, PhD, UNC Chapel Hill, spoke on “Crowdsourcing Contests and Community Engagement for HIV Cure Research: A Mixed Methods Evaluation” and Sarah Joseph, PhD, UNC Chapel Hill, shared information on “HIV in the Brain: Observations from Throughout Infection”.

The UNC CFAR was represented at a number of other WAD events around the triangle this year, including the Red Tie Affair at UNC and the Durham County WAD Commemoration.

In addition to the World AIDS Day Symposium, the UNC CFAR supported a variety of community events around the triangle. One such event was the annual Red Tie Affair, hosted by UNC organization GlobeMed, a group of students dedicated to fighting for global health equity.

The benefit gala united students and health professionals to engage in a compassionate dialogue about HIV/AIDS. The UNC CFAR was represented by Myron S. Cohen, MD and David Wohl, MD. Dr. Cohen, Associate Director of the CFAR, presented on HIV prevention efforts in 2016 and offered suggestions on how to continue propelling these efforts forward. Dr. David Wohl, Professor of Medicine in the UNC Division of Infectious Diseases, presented on HIV Therapy and the incredible strides that have been made in the search for a cure.

Proceeds for the event will support GlobeMed’s partnership with Young Love, an organization based in Botswana with a mission to implement life-saving sexual health education programs for youth in Southern Africa.

The UNC CFAR CODE office was represented by Office Director Caressa White at the Durham County World AIDS Day Commemoration. The event was held in Durham Central Park, featuring remarks from Michael Wilson and Virginia Mitchell, Chairs of the HIV/STI committee. Caressa White shared a timeline of the HIV/AIDS epidemic and attendees enjoyed artistic performances by TAKIRY Dance Group from El Centro Hispano and Voices from the Heart from Triangle Empowerment Center. Following a candle lighting ceremony in remembrance of those we have lost to the epidemic, the crowd walked to the LGBTQ Center of Durham for a group viewing of an HIV/AIDS-themed photography exhibit “I Still Remember” and reception.

2016 UNC-Duke Viral Oncology & AIDS Malignancy Symposium

Click here to register!

Featuring:

Dr. Frederick Wang, Professor, Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Dr. Sallie Permar, Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Duke Global Health Institute,“Maternal antibody protection against congenital cytomegalovirus infection”

Dr. Corey Casper, Head of Global Oncology, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Professor, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, “Impact of HIV on Strategies to Prevent Infection and Associated Cancers”

Directions to the Carolina Club are available here.

Workshop on Microbial Genome Sequencing

December 12 – 16, 2016

Harvard Medical School

Hosted by the Harvard University CFAR, in collaboration with the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT & Harvard, and the Clinical and Translational Epidemiology Unit at MGH,

The fee for the workshop is $350, which covers some of the costs associated with holding the workshop.

This workshop is open to all CFAR investigators.

 

For more meeting details, click here.

To register, click here.

Connected Health Conference

December 11-14, 2016
National Harbor, MD

The 8th annual Connected Health Conference (formerly the mHealth Summit), provides the global platform for leadership, innovation and opportunity to achieve our new and ambitious vision of personal connected health for all. The theme is Personal Connected Health for All: Expanding Reach, Accelerating Impact.

Registration details here.

2016 World AIDS Day Symposium

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER FOR THE MORNING AND/OR AFTERNOON SESSIONS!

 

Registration 8:00AM-8:30AM

Morning Session: HIV Clinical Epidemiology 8:30AM-12:00PM

8:30-8:40am – Introduction – Claire Farel, MD, MPH, UNC Chapel Hill
8:40-9:10am – David Wohl, MD, UNC Chapel Hill – “Spotlight on HIV Clinical Care”
9:10-10:10am – KEYNOTE SPEAKER: Michael Mugavero, MD, MHSc, University of Alabama – “Ending AIDS in Alabama”
10:10-10:40am – Erica Samoff, PhD, MPH, North Carolina Division of Public Health – “HIV Epidemiology in North Carolina”
10:40-11:00am – BREAK
11:00am-12:00pm – Patient Panel: Perspectives on Access to HIV Care

Lunch 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM

Afternoon Session: HIV Reservoirs 1:00PM-3:00PM

1:00-1:10pm – Introduction – Jennifer Webster-Cyriaque, DDS, PhD, UNC Chapel Hill
1:10-1:30pm – Nilu Goonetilleke, PhD, UNC Chapel Hill – “The Role of the Immune Response in Curing HIV”
1:30-1:50pm – Allison Mathews, PhD, UNC Chapel Hill – “Crowdsourcing Contests and Community Engagement for HIV Cure Research: A Mixed Methods Evaluation”
1:50-2:10pm – Sarah Joseph, PhD, UNC Chapel Hill – “HIV in the Brain: Observations From Throughout Infection”
2:10-2:55pm – KEYNOTE SPEAKER: Elizabeth Connick, MD, University of Arizona – “The Role of the B Cell Follicular Sanctuary in HIV Immunopathogenesis”
2:55-3:00pm – Evaluations

 

World AIDS Day, started in 1988, is an opportunity for people worldwide to unite in the fight against HIV, increase awareness, combat stigma, and improve education. The World AIDS Day Symposium features presentations by UNC faculty members, expert research and medical professionals, and panel discussions. The event is sponsored by the UNC Center for AIDS Research and the UNC Institute for Global Health and Infectious Diseases.

Currin Named Certified Nurse of the Year

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David Currin, RN, ACRN, CCRC, will also be honored as the HIV/AIDS Nursing Certification Board’s 2016 Certified Nurse of the Year.

“I was so surprised and excited when I received the letter that I would be receiving this year’s award,” says Currin, who serves as the Certified Clinical Research Coordinator and the Clinical Quality Program Manager for UNC’s Global HIV Prevention and Treatment Clinical Trials Unit. “Honors and awards are not why I do this work. I am going to dedicate this award to the memory of the friends I lost in the 1980s and 1990s to HIV.”

Certified as a research coordinator and an HIV nurse clinician, Currin has spent the past 15 years seeing patients on study at UNC and at affiliated site like the Wake County Health Department. At any given time, he sees participants from five to six studies, including those funded by the government and those trials funded by pharmaceutical companies. He splits his time between these duties and overseeing the team who manage the data collected by the unit’s many studies.

“My heart is really in seeing research patients,” Currin says. “I got my start after nursing school at the state’s mental health hospital. When I came to UNC in 2001, the first studies I saw patients on were treatment naïve trials. These were people who were being diagnosed with HIV and had never initiated therapy. Because of my psychiatry background, I felt I could help them identify ways to accept their diagnosis and the lifelong commitment of taking daily medications.”

Read more here…

International Conference on Stigma: “Standing Together against Fear, Blame, and Shame”

November 18, 2016
Washington, DC

The overarching goals of this conference are to increase awareness of the stigma of HIV and other health conditions and to explore interventions to eradicate this stigma. The conference also serves to educate healthcare providers and the general public about stigma as both a human rights violation and a major barrier to prevention and treatment of illnesses.

To register for the conference click here.

Women and HIV Cure: Barriers and Facilitators to Women’s Participation in Cure Research

A Three-Part Webinar Series Presented by the Women’s HIV Research Collaborative (Part 3)

Thursday, November 17

In recent years, the scientific community has made great strides toward finding a cure for HIV. Activists and advocates are rightfully excited about these developments, but many questions remain about what a cure will entail and how the science might reach different populations and communities. While cure research has generated exciting results, it is crucial that these results include and are relevant to all people with HIV. Women, however, are often excluded or otherwise left out of HIV cure efforts. The members of the Women’s HIV Research Collaborative (WHRC) believe that cure research must include women—cisgender and transgender alike—in order to produce results that are applicable and meaningful to women. In this spirit of sisterhood and the meaningful involvement of people with HIV, the WHRC has assembled a diverse group of expert women working in community advocacy, biomedical research, and bioethics to guide us through this three-part webinar series.

Women and HIV Cure: What Cure Means to Women, What Women Mean to Cure

A Three-Part Webinar Series Presented by the Women’s HIV Research Collaborative (Part 2)

Tuesday, October 25

In recent years, the scientific community has made great strides toward finding a cure for HIV. Activists and advocates are rightfully excited about these developments, but many questions remain about what a cure will entail and how the science might reach different populations and communities. While cure research has generated exciting results, it is crucial that these results include and are relevant to all people with HIV. Women, however, are often excluded or otherwise left out of HIV cure efforts. The members of the Women’s HIV Research Collaborative (WHRC) believe that cure research must include women—cisgender and transgender alike—in order to produce results that are applicable and meaningful to women. In this spirit of sisterhood and the meaningful involvement of people with HIV, the WHRC has assembled a diverse group of expert women working in community advocacy, biomedical research, and bioethics to guide us through this three-part webinar series.