Ryan White Remembered

April 8 marks the 28 year anniversary of Ryan White’s death.

Before HIV transmission was well understood, factor 8, a protein important to blood clotting, was often pooled from hundreds of untested blood donations.  This exposed hemophilia patients like Ryan White to HIV; in an article for PBS Newshour, Dr. Howard Markel recalls that “virtually every hemophiliac [he] treated in the mid-1980s has since died from AIDS.”

Ryan White was a teenager living with hemophilia during this time period.  He was diagnosed with HIV in December, 1984, and became an eloquent spokesperson for people living with HIV.  Among other forms of stigma, Ryan White was initially not permitted to attend school after his HIV diagnosis.  After winning a court case to resume in-person attendance at school, Ryan and his family faced intense hostility from community members, and relocated to Cicero, Indiana.

Photo by L. Cohen/WireImage

Homophobia and misinformation about HIV transmission were rampant sources of prejudice against people living with HIV; Ryan White’s advocacy helped dispel some of the misinformation about the nature and transmission of HIV/AIDS.

Months after Ryan White’s death on April 8, 1990, President George H. W. Bush signed the Ryan White CARE Act to help cities, states, and community organizations to develop comprehensive systems of care; the legislation targeted the poorest people living in the United States with HIV/AIDS.

Biostatistics Core presents work at Summer Conferences

Yinyan & Ilana

Ilana Trumble from the CFAR Biostatistics Core presented a poster at the Collaboratory of AIDS Researchers for Eradication (CARE) Annual Meeting in June 2017, together with Yinyan Xu. This work from the Goonetilleke Lab (G lab) is entitled “Longitudinal assessment of baseline variation in HIV-1 specific T cell responses in HIV-1 infected, durably suppressed individuals.” For more information on the G lab, click here.

Wang Cheng Poster

Wang Cheng, visiting scholar from UNC Project China, is researching the generalizability of online randomized control trials. His work was presented at the Atlantic Causal Inference Conference, Chapel Hill, NC, May 2017. This work was a joint collaboration between UNC Project China, the Chinese Center for Disease Control (C-CDC), and the UNC CFAR Biostatistics Core. For more information about UNC Project China, click here.

Blog: ID Clinic Director Claire Farel, MD, MPH, Answers Most Common Patient Questions

Claire Farel, MD, MPH, medical director of the UNC Infectious Diseases Clinic.

Claire Farel, MD, MPH, medical director of the UNC Infectious Diseases Clinic.

Claire Farel, MD, MPH, is an assistant professor of medicine in the UNC School of Medicine and medical director of the UNC Infectious Diseases Clinic. In answering the most common questions she is asked as a clinician, Dr. Farel illustrates the vast prevention and treatment services available at the clinic, and how they can be accessed.

I love it when patients ask questions. Being able to partner with patients in their care keeps all of us in the UNC Infectious Diseases (ID) Clinic going. Asking questions shows that patients and their families are engaged in what all of us find most important: a healthier life, an understanding of illness and treatment, reliable information to pass along to others, support during stressful times, options for prevention of infection, maybe even a lasting contribution to science.

There are some questions I get more than others. The following are some of the perennial favorites:

“My significant other has HIV. What can I do to keep from getting it?”
We love to get the word out about HIV prevention resources. If your loved one is on HIV medications already and doing well with an “undetectable” amount of virus on blood tests, their risk of passing HIV on to anyone else is greatly reduced by somewhere between 92-100 percent. We call this “treatment as prevention,” but there are other ways to use HIV medications to keep from getting the virus. You can take a pill every day to prevent HIV before an exposure, known as pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP. Using PrEP consistently creates a “shield” in your body against possible infection, dropping the risk of acquiring HIV by at least 90 percent. In an emergency situation (for example, if a condom breaks during sex or in cases of sexual assault), you can take a combination of medications called post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) to prevent infection after an exposure. There’s a fixed window of time for PEP medications to have a benefit, however – so it’s important to start those emergency medications within three days of the exposure. Our emergency department has expertise in providing this care and our clinic team can assist in accessing preventative medicine if needed.

We are happy to see folks who are interested in HIV prevention in our clinic and can offer lots of resources to make taking preventative medicine manageable and affordable – as well as advice on protecting yourself in other ways.

“How can I arrange to be seen in your clinic?”
We have special programs for HIV-positive patients that allow self-referral – just give us a call (information is included below) to arrange an appointment. We require that most other patients get a referral from a medical provider (such as a primary care provider or another specialist). Having your medical records and the initial workup for your problem allows us to provide a focused, expert consultation. We advise that anyone at risk gets testing for HIV and hepatitis C as recommended by the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), either through regular healthcare provider, free testing events, or local health departments. We take referrals from all of these sources and provide hepatitis C treatment through our clinic if you have a new or longstanding diagnosis.

Our contact information is below, or many practices can send referrals electronically.

UNC Infectious Diseases Clinic
101 Manning Drive, 1st floor Memorial Hospital
Chapel Hill, NC 27599
Phone: 984-974-7198
Fax: 984-974-4587
http://www.med.unc.edu/infdis/clinical-care/infectious-diseases-clinic

Our mission is to provide excellent clinical care and education for all of our patients, whatever their concern, and to offer them every advance and advantage in our field to keep them healthy. Keep asking questions!

For more information and commonly asked questions, please visit the Institute for Global Health and Infectious Diseases Blog!

Combination Therapy in HIV Cure Research Conference

Dr David MargolisThe Collaboratory of AIDS Researchers for Eradication (CARE) is hosting a community presentation:

Combination Therapy in HIV Cure Research
Monday, September 15, 2014
11 am – 12 pm EDT | 8 – 9 am PDT

Speaker: David M. Margolis, MD, FACP
Professor of Medicine, Microbiology and Immunology, Epidemiology
Principal Investigator, Collaboratory of AIDS Researchers for Eradication (CARE)
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH)
Institute for Global Health and Infectious Diseases (IGHID)

To join the online meeting:

1. Go to this website.
2. If requested, enter your name and email address.
3. If a password is required, enter the meeting password: care2cure
4. Click “Join”.

To join the audio conference through telephone:

US TOLL FREE: +1-855-282-6330
US TOLL: +1-415-655-0003

Time: 10:45 am, Eastern Daylight Time
Meeting Number: 734-892-997
Meeting Password: care2cure

For assistance, visit this website. On the left navigation bar, click “Support”.