Body Counts Talk and Roundtable Discussion with Sean Strub

Sero ProjectThe UNC Program in Sexuality Studies is sponsoring two events with Sean Strub, founder of POZ Magazine and executive director of the Sero Project.

Thursday, September 11th, 5 pm and 7 pm

Hitchcock Room, Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History, UNC-CH Campus

Parking: Bell Tower Parking Deck directly behind the Stone Center for free after 5pm

Both events are free and open to the public

• 5pm: Body Counts: A Memoir of Politics, Sex, AIDS, and Survival, book reading and signing with author, Sean Strub, at the Bull’s Head Bookshop in the Student Stores Building, UNC-CH

• 7pm: Roundtable Discussion with Sean Strub: “The Politics of HIV and AIDS, Then and Now”

Panel participants include:
-Karen Booth, faculty, Women’s and Gender Studies, UNC-CH
-Richard Cante, faculty, Communication Studies and Director, Program in Sexuality Studies, UNC-CH
-Carolyn McAllaster, Duke University School of Law, Duke AIDS Legal Project, and Southern HIV/AIDS Strategy Initiative

Sean Strub is the founder of POZ Magazine, executive director of the Sero Project, a US-based network of people with HIV combating criminalization and is the author of Body Counts: A Memoir of Politics, Sex, AIDS, and Survival (Scribner 2014). A longtime activist and HIV survivor, he was the first openly HIV positive person to run for the U.S. Congress, produced the off-Broadway hit The Night Larry Kramer Kissed Me and from 2010-2012 co-chaired the North American affiliate of the Global Network of People Living with HIV (GNP+/NA).

Friday ID Conference: Power and Sample Size Boot Camp

Katie MollanThis week marks the start of the CFAR/IGHID Friday ID Conference Series for the 2014-2015 school year.

Power and Sample Size Boot Camp
Speakers: Michael Hudgens and Katie Mollan
UNC CFAR Biostatistics Core

September 5, 2014
8:30-9:30 a.m.
1131 Bioinformatics (first floor auditorium), UNC-CH Campus

The CFAR Biostatistics Core will present on power and sample size calculation using examples from HIV research. Topics will include an introduction to statistical power and related terminology, a discussion of the investigator and statistician roles in sample size calculation, and presentation of statistical software and brief formulas for sample size and power computation.

2014-2015 Friday ID Conference Series Begins

This week marks the start of the CFAR/IGHID Friday ID Conference Series for the 2014-2015 school year.

Power and Sample Size Boot Camp
Speakers: Michael Hudgens and Katie Mollan
UNC CFAR Biostatistics Core

September 5, 2014
8:30-9:30 a.m.
1131 Bioinformatics (first floor auditorium), UNC-CH Campus

The CFAR Biostatistics Core will present on power and sample size calculation using examples from HIV research. Topics will include an introduction to statistical power and related terminology, a discussion of the investigator and statistician roles in sample size calculation, and presentation of statistical software and brief formulas for sample size and power computation.

UNC CFAR partners with the clinical division of infectious diseases and the Institute for Global Health & Infectious Disease on a weekly conference series featuring distinguished clinicians and scientists from UNC, local universities, and other national and international institutions. The topics are varied and appeal to not only infectious disease specialists, but also professionals in epidemiology, public health, microbiology, biostatistics and other global health-related disciplines.

The conference takes place every Friday (September through May) from 8:30-9:30 a.m. in 1131 Bioinformatics (first floor auditorium) on the UNC campus. For more information, please contact the conference coordinator, Kathy James. To suggest a speaker, contact the faculty organizer, David Wohl.

For the current conference schedule, please click here.

New book: Innovations in HIV Prevention Research and Practice through Community Engagement

Innovations in HIV ResearchUNC CFAR investigator Scott Rhodes, PhD, MPH, from the Wake Forest School of Medicine has edited a new book: Innovations in HIV Prevention Research and Practice through Community Engagement.

Leaders in the field who are working at various points along the community-engagement continuum, with diverse populations, and different types of HIV prevention interventions (e.g., individual, community, and structural) have contributed important chapters that outline both innovative interventions designed to reduce HIV risk among some of the most affected communities and authentic and meaningful approaches to engagement, partnership, and CBPR. Chapter authors include community members who may come from communities greatly affected by HIV in the United States; organization representatives who are providing services to members of these communities; business representatives; federal scientists and practitioners; and academic researchers who must negotiate the challenges of their institutions (e.g., tenure and funding) and federal and foundation funders who may not understand the challenges and potential successes associated with authentic engagement, partnership, and CBPR.

Information can be found at Springer and at Amazon.

Cohen to deliver 2014 Norma Berryhill Distinguished Lecture

Dr. Myron CohenCFAR Associate Director Dr. Myron Cohen (Associate Vice Chancellor for Global Health; Yeargan-Bate Eminent Distinguished Professor of Medicine, Microbiology and Immunology, and Epidemiology; and Chief, Division of Infectious Diseases and Director, Institute for Global Health & Infectious Diseases) will deliver the 2014 Norma Berryhill Distinguished Lecture.

The event will be held Wednesday, October 22, at 5:30 p.m. at the Carolina Club. A reception with light refreshments will be held immediately following the lecture at 6:30 p.m.

The Dean and Advisory Committee of the School of Medicine established the Norma Berryhill Lectureship in September 1984. The Lectureship has two essential components: (1) a Lecture to be given annually by a tenured or tenure-track member of the faculty of the Medical School and (2) a convocation of the Medical School to be held at the time of the Lecture and at which new faculty members will be recognized.

The selection of the Norma Berryhill Lecturer is meant to honor a member of the faculty whose accomplishments have added distinction to the Medical School. The convocation is also intended to further a sense of community within the Medical School. Because Mrs. Berryhill was a major champion in promoting community connections, the Lectureship was named in her honor.

Video from Dr. Cohen on the Global AIDS Epidemic: Where Epidemiology Meets Biology and Public Health

UNC CFAR in the News: HIV drug linked to higher suicide risk

The UNC CFAR is getting exciting news coverage! Our researchers Katie Mollan, MS, Joe Eron, MD, Kevin Robertson, MD, and ACTG investigators have been featured in WedMD, Harvard News, and MedPage Today for their new article which explores the risks of anti-HIV drug efavirenz. This drug appears to double the risk that patients will develop suicidal thoughts or take their lives.

Study co-author Dr. Joseph Eron shared that “Efavirenz is a very important and effective antiretroviral medication that is the foundation for much of HIV therapy worldwide.” Dr. Eron explained that “suicidality (i.e. suicidal thoughts or suicidal behavior or suicide death) is a very serious adverse event that requires clinicians to actively engage patients to assess risk”. This new study demonstrates a clear association between efavirenz and suicidality.

Although the absolute risk of suicidality is relatively small, Eron explained that it appears to be persistent, lasting as long as patients take the drug. Antiretroviral treatment typically is lifelong, helping people with the AIDS-causing virus live healthier lives.

“Clinicians should be aware of this ongoing risk, and talk to their patients to assess suicidality,” Eron added. That means looking for any history of depression or suicidal thoughts or attempts, the study noted.

Good alternatives to efavirenz do exist for patient who may need to start, or to switch to, another therapy. In settings where alternative therapies are not available, the benefits of efavirenz-based therapy with management of depression will usually outweigh the risks of no treatment, especially for people with low CD4 cell counts.

Follow the coverage:

WebMD: “Common HIV Drug May Boost Suicide Risk”

Harvard News: “Widely Used HIV Drug Linked to Higher Suicide Risk”

MedPage Today: HIV Drug Linked to Suicidality Risk

Video Clip: The link between Efavirenz and Suicide