2016 World AIDS Day Symposium

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER FOR THE MORNING AND/OR AFTERNOON SESSIONS!

 

Registration 8:00AM-8:30AM

Morning Session: HIV Clinical Epidemiology 8:30AM-12:00PM

8:30-8:40am – Introduction – Claire Farel, MD, MPH, UNC Chapel Hill
8:40-9:10am – David Wohl, MD, UNC Chapel Hill – “Spotlight on HIV Clinical Care”
9:10-10:10am – KEYNOTE SPEAKER: Michael Mugavero, MD, MHSc, University of Alabama – “Ending AIDS in Alabama”
10:10-10:40am – Erica Samoff, PhD, MPH, North Carolina Division of Public Health – “HIV Epidemiology in North Carolina”
10:40-11:00am – BREAK
11:00am-12:00pm – Patient Panel: Perspectives on Access to HIV Care

Lunch 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM

Afternoon Session: HIV Reservoirs 1:00PM-3:00PM

1:00-1:10pm – Introduction – Jennifer Webster-Cyriaque, DDS, PhD, UNC Chapel Hill
1:10-1:30pm – Nilu Goonetilleke, PhD, UNC Chapel Hill – “The Role of the Immune Response in Curing HIV”
1:30-1:50pm – Allison Mathews, PhD, UNC Chapel Hill – “Crowdsourcing Contests and Community Engagement for HIV Cure Research: A Mixed Methods Evaluation”
1:50-2:10pm – Sarah Joseph, PhD, UNC Chapel Hill – “HIV in the Brain: Observations From Throughout Infection”
2:10-2:55pm – KEYNOTE SPEAKER: Elizabeth Connick, MD, University of Arizona – “The Role of the B Cell Follicular Sanctuary in HIV Immunopathogenesis”
2:55-3:00pm – Evaluations

 

World AIDS Day, started in 1988, is an opportunity for people worldwide to unite in the fight against HIV, increase awareness, combat stigma, and improve education. The World AIDS Day Symposium features presentations by UNC faculty members, expert research and medical professionals, and panel discussions. The event is sponsored by the UNC Center for AIDS Research and the UNC Institute for Global Health and Infectious Diseases.

Women and HIV Cure: What Cure Means to Women, What Women Mean to Cure

A Three-Part Webinar Series Presented by the Women’s HIV Research Collaborative (Part 2)

Tuesday, October 25

In recent years, the scientific community has made great strides toward finding a cure for HIV. Activists and advocates are rightfully excited about these developments, but many questions remain about what a cure will entail and how the science might reach different populations and communities. While cure research has generated exciting results, it is crucial that these results include and are relevant to all people with HIV. Women, however, are often excluded or otherwise left out of HIV cure efforts. The members of the Women’s HIV Research Collaborative (WHRC) believe that cure research must include women—cisgender and transgender alike—in order to produce results that are applicable and meaningful to women. In this spirit of sisterhood and the meaningful involvement of people with HIV, the WHRC has assembled a diverse group of expert women working in community advocacy, biomedical research, and bioethics to guide us through this three-part webinar series.

UNC HIV Cure Seminar: Understanding mechanisms of HIV persistence using virus sequence analysis in HIV controllers

A talk by Eli Boritz, M.D., Ph.D.
NIAID Clinical Fellow
National Institute Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) National Institutes of Health
Bethesda, MD

Targeted HIV cure strategies require definition of the mechanisms that maintain the virus. We tracked HIV replication and the persistence of infected CD4 T cells in individuals with natural virologic control by sequencing viruses, T cell receptor genes, HIV integration sites and cellular transcriptomes. Our results revealed three mechanisms of HIV persistence operating within distinct anatomic and functional compartments. In lymph node, we detected viruses with genetic and transcriptional attributes of active replication in both T follicular helper (TFH) cells and non-TFH memory cells. In blood, we detected inducible proviruses of archival origin among highly differentiated, clonally expanded cells. Linking the lymph node and blood was a small population of circulating cells harboring inducible proviruses of recent origin. Thus, HIV replication in lymphoid tissue, clonal expansion of infected cells, and recirculation of recently infected cells act together to maintain the virus in HIV controllers despite effective antiviral immunity.

Refreshments will be served.

HIV cure research Q & A with Dr. Tucker and Dr. Rennie

joe200stuart200CFAR Investigators Dr. Joseph Tucker and Dr. Stuart Rennie are experts in the field of HIV research. As a part of their searcHIV project, a multi-site, multi-disciplinary working group focusing on investigating the biosocial implications of curing HIV infection, they have created a Q & A page to answer questions about HIV cure. The goal of the Q&A section is to provide an open, transparent, bidirectional dialogue about HIV cure research.

Read their answers to “How close are scientists to a cure?” and “How do I get selected for an HIV trial” here. More questions and answers will be posted in the months to come.

CUREiculum Webinar Series: Early ART

The CUREiculum is a suite of tools that provides simple, accessible information on HIV cure research. As part of the effort to increase research literacy around cure, the CUREiculum team, a collaboration of community educators, researchers and advocacy organizations, will be presenting a webinar series that focus on issue-specific topics crucial to understanding the research landscape.

Early ART
Thursday, April 2nd at 11 am ET

Dr. Jintanat Ananworanich, Associate Director for Therapeutics Research at the U.S. Military HIV Research Program (MHRP) of the Walter Reed Army Institute for Research (WRAIR), will present the scientific mechanisms of early treatment and explain how it relates to HIV cure research. Administering early antiretroviral therapy can have a significant impact on limiting the reservoir- the cells that contain non-replicating HIV- in an HIV-positive individual. Starting ART very early after HIV infection has been linked to very low viral loads and even to apparent “remission” (periods of no detectable viral load)

Register here for webinar details!

For more information, please contact Jessica or Karine.

CUREiculum Webinar Series: Latency Reversing Agents

The CUREiculum is a suite of tools that provides simple, accessible information on HIV cure research. As part of the effort to increase research literacy around cure, the CUREiculum team, a collaboration of community educators, researchers and advocacy organizations, will be presenting a webinar series that focus on issue-specific topics crucial to understanding the research landscape.

Latency Reversing Agents
Thursday March 26th, 4 pm ET

This webinar will feature Dr. David Margolis, Principal Investigator of the CARE Collaboratory at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and Dr. Sharon Lewin member of the DARE Collaboratory and Director of the Infectious Disease department at Monash University. Latency reversing agents are biological compounds used to “wake up” HIV infected cells from their resting state in the body. The drugs are used as the “kick”, the first in a two phase strategy often called “kick and kill”. Both researchers will discuss what latency reversing agents are and how the research might contribute to a combination curative strategy.

Register here for webinar details!

For more information, please contact Jessica or Karine.

CUREiculum Webinar Series: Stakeholder Engagement in Cure Research

The CUREiculum is a suite of tools that provides simple, accessible information on HIV cure research. As part of the effort to increase research literacy around cure, the CUREiculum team, a collaboration of community educators, researchers and advocacy organizations, will be presenting a webinar series that focus on issue-specific topics crucial to understanding the research landscape.

Stakeholder Engagement in Cure Research
Friday March 13th, 11 am ET

This webinar, led by Jessica Handibode of AVAC, will discuss how the Good Participatory Practice (GPP) guidelines, developed by UNAIDS and AVAC, can be applied to HIV cure research. GPP provides trial funders, sponsors and implementers with systematic guidance on how to effectively engage with all stakeholders. Drawing from the literature and past HIV prevention trials, the webinar will explore the history and importance of engaging community stakeholders early in the research process.

Register here for webinar detail!

For more information, please contact Jessica or Karine.

Dr. Margolis Featured in New Yorker Article on HIV Cure

Dr David MargolisThe New Yorker recently featured the research of UNC School of Medicine researcher David Margolis, MD, in this article about the search for a cure to HIV infection.

Margolis, a professor of medicine, epidemiology, and microbiology and immunology, serves as director of the School of Medicine’s Program in Translational Clinical Research.

Dr. Margolis currently leads the largest collaboration of HIV researchers, working to force HIV out of “latency” so they can attempt to kill virus particles that typically lay dormant, hidden from therapies. Margolis was among the first researchers to explore methods to force HIV particles out of latency, which is considered a major obstacle to finding curative therapies.

Read the full story here.

UNC CFAR Investigators Featured at CROI 2015

CROI 2015Five abstracts from UNC CFAR have been accepted for presentation at the poster session at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) 2015, each of which were supported by the UNC CFAR’s Biostatistics Core. This annual collaborative science conference brings together top basic, translational, and clinical researchers from around the world to share the latest studies, important developments, and best research methods in the ongoing battle against HIV/AIDS and related infectious diseases. CROI 2015 will be held from February 23 to February 26, 2015, in Seattle, Washington, at the Washington State Convention Center. Congratulations to all our CFAR investigators for their hard work and dedication!

Poster presentations that will feature UNC CFAR investigators at the conference this year:

Davis N, Miller W, Hudgens M, Chasela C, Sichali D, Nelson J, Rigdon J, Ellington S, Kourtis A, and van der Horst C. ARV adherence associated with reduced breastmilk HIV viral load and HIV transmission. 22nd Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, Seattle, Washington, 2015.

Jensen K, Van Rompay K, Jacobs W, Fennelly G, Mollan K, Hudgens M, Piatak M, Larsen M, De Paris K. The potential of BCG and HIV-TB vaccines to exacerbate HIV-1 pathogenesis in infants. 22nd Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, Seattle, Washington, 2015.

Joseph S, Kincer L, Bowman N, Menezes P, Robertson K, Anderson A, Loring D, Eron J, Price R, Swanstrom R. HIV-1 Replication in the CNS is Associated With Increased Neurocognitive Impairment. 22nd Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, Seattle, Washington, 2015.

King C, Nelson J, Ziemniak C, Hudgens M, Tegha G, Chasela C, Jamieson D, Persaud D, van der Horst C, Kourtis A. Delayed HIV Detection in Infants Exposed to ARV Prophylaxis During Breastfeeding. 22nd Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, Seattle, Washington, 2015.

Nelson J, Fokar A, Hudgens M, Compliment K, Tegha G, Kamwendo D, Kourtis A, Jamieson D, van der Horst C, Fiscus S. NVP Resistance in Infants Infected by HIV-1 via Breastfeeding in the BAN Study. 22nd Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, Seattle, Washington, 2015.

Strategies for an HIV Cure 2014 Conference

Cure“Strategies for an HIV Cure 2014” Conference

Wednesday, October 15- Friday, October 17, 2014, NIH Campus, Bethesda, MA

Registration deadline: Monday, September 29

For more information, visit: https://www.blsmeetings.net/HIVCureMeeting2014/index.cfm

The Division of AIDS (DAIDS) at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Institutes of Health (NIH), is sponsoring a scientific meeting focused on the development of innovative strategies to cure HIV infection. The meeting will cover a comprehensive range of topics spanning basic and translational research, drug discovery and development, and clinical research.