PrEP Open House

NCATEC will be hosting “PrEP Open House: What Doctors Need to Know; What Patients Need to Ask” on Friday June 29 from 2pm to 3:30pm in the first floor auditorium of the Bioinformatics Building (130 Mason Farm Road) on the campus of UNC-Chapel Hill.  Public parking is available across the street.

This training will address clinical PrEP basics for those interested in prescribing this one-pill-a-day regimen for the prevention of HIV.  The presentation will also cover questions that consumers would want to ask themselves about their readiness to take PrEP and whether or not PrEP is right for them.  The training center will review its online PrEP resources for providers and consumers and review PrEP materials available in English and Spanish.

Please register early as we expect a strong interest in this training.

Testing Antibodies to Prevent HIV

Myron Cohen, MD, co-authored a perspective in Science about broadly neutralizing antibodies.

The journal Science published a perspective on Oct. 6, by two leading HIV investigators highlighting the next frontier of HIV prevention – broadly neutralizing antibodies or bnAbs.

Antibodies to HIV can be found in 25 percent of people living with the virus who are not on treatment, wrote perspective co-author Myron Cohen, MD, associate director of the UNC CFAR. These broadly neutralizing antibodies are now being tested for HIV prevention in the Antibody Mediated Prevention (AMP) study.

The AMP study will test the efficacy of antibody VRC01 in patients. Participants in the study will be given an intravenous infusion of the VRC01 antibody or a placebo 10 times, once every eight weeks.

Men who have sex with men, transgender women, and transgender men who have sex with men are eligible for the study. AMP is being conducted in North America, South America, and Africa. UNC is a site.

To learn more about bnAbs, read the perspective in Science. To watch a presentation Cohen gave about bnAbs on Oct. 13, visit our Friday Morning Conference archives.

HPTN 083 Webinar – Give PrEP a Shot!

The HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) has launched a new study, HPTN 083, to evaluate whether injectable cabotegravir (CAB) can safely protect cisgender men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women (TGW) who have sex with men from acquiring HIV as well as Truvada, an oral tablet taken daily for HIV prevention, also known as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). If found to be safe and effective for HIV PrEP, injectable CAB may be easier for some people to adhere to than daily oral Truvada.
 
This webinar will provide a comprehensive overview of HPTN 083 by explaining why the study is being done and what will happen during the study. Additionally, the HPTN’s commitment to community participation at all levels of research will be described by detailing the many community involvement and engagement activities used in preparation for the study and now during its implementation.
 
For more information about the HIV Prevention Trials Network and HPTN 083, please visit http://www.HPTN.org.

Publication of HPTN 052 Final Results: HIV Treatment Offers Durable Prevention of HIV Transmission in Serodiscordant Couples

The HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) announced that the final results of the HPTN 052 study were published in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM). This pivotal study demonstrated that antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV infection provides durable and reliable protection against the sexual transmission of the virus from infected men and women to their HIV-uninfected sexual partners.

The final results showed a 93 percent reduction of HIV transmission when the HIV-infected person started ART when their immune system was relatively healthy. HIV transmission from HIV-infected study participants to their partners was not observed when viral replication in the treated individual was stably suppressed by ART.

“The HPTN 052 study confirms the urgent need to treat people for HIV infection as soon as it is diagnosed to protect their health and for public health,” said Myron S. Cohen, M.D., principal investigator for HPTN 052 and director of the Institute for Global Health and Infectious Diseases at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. “This study represents more than a decade of effort by a worldwide team of investigators, and the tremendous courage and generosity of more than 3,500 clinical trial participants.”

HPTN 052 began in 2005 and enrolled 1,763 HIV-serodiscordant couples – where one person was HIV infected and the other was not – at 13 sites in nine countries (Botswana, Brazil, India, Kenya, Malawi, South Africa, Thailand, the United States, and Zimbabwe). The majority of the couples were heterosexual (97 percent). HIV-infected participants were assigned at random to start ART at the beginning of the study when their immune system was relatively healthy (called the “early” arm), or later in the study when they had immune system decline (called the “delayed” arm).

In 2011, interim study results demonstrated significant benefit of early ART, with a 96 percent reduction in HIV transmission from early ART compared to delayed ART. This finding was reported based on the recommendation of the study’s data safety and monitoring board; presented at the 6th International AIDS Society (IAS) Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention in Rome, Italy; and published in NEJM.

All HIV-infected participants in the study were then offered ART and the study was continued until May 2015 to understand the magnitude and durability of “treatment as prevention”; 87 percent of the HIV-infected participants remained in the study for its 10-year duration.

The HPTN 052 results have helped to galvanize a worldwide commitment to a universal “treatment as prevention” strategy for combatting the HIV/AIDS epidemic, with ART offered to all HIV-infected people, regardless of CD4 cell count.

About HPTN 052

HPTN 052 was a randomized, controlled trial designed to evaluate the effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy (ART) to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV in serodiscordant couples. The trial was conducted by the HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) and funded by the U.S., National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH). Additional support was provided by the NIAID-funded AIDS Clinical Trials Group. The antiretroviral drugs used in the study were made available by Abbott Laboratories; Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.; Bristol-Myers Squibb; Gilead Sciences; GlaxoSmithKline; and Merck & Co., Inc.

2015 National HIV Prevention Conference (NHPC)

2015 National HIV Prevention Conference

The 2015 National HIV Prevention Conference (NHPC) will be held on December 6-9, 2015, in Atlanta, GA.

This is the preeminent conference for scientists, public health officials, community workers, clinicians, and persons living with HIV from a wide variety of organizations to share their expertise and ultimately prevent infections, strengthen care and reduce disparities.

The National HIV Prevention Conference allows for in-person collaboration between researchers and program personnel planning and implementing HIV prevention and care programs. The conference will bring together more than 3,000 individuals who are working to stop the spread of HIV in the United States. It will provide an opportunity to continue refining, improving, and strengthening our nation’s response to HIV.

This four-day conference will include oral, panel and poster presentations, as well as plenary sessions, roundtables, and debates and is a platform for conference participants to engage in rigorous scientific, programmatic, and technology information exchange.

International Conference on HIV Treatment and Prevention Adherence

IAPACThe International Association of Providers of AIDS Care (IAPAC) is hosting the 10th annual International Conference on HIV Treatment and Prevention Adherence.

June 28-30, 2015
Eden Roc Miami Beach Hotel, Miami, FL

The conference provides an annual forum for the presentation and discussion of state-of-the-science HIV treatment and biomedical prevention adherence research, as well as current behavioral and clinical perspectives in practicum, within the context of achieving the maximum therapeutic and preventative benefit of antiretroviral therapy across the continuum of care.

Early registration is available until January 9th.

More information can be found on the event page.

Registration will be open through May 8. IAPAC offers reduced rates for your hotel stay, as well as flights through several airlines.

World AIDS Day Clinical Trials Twitter Chat and ‘HIV Clinical Trials: A Year in Review’ Webinar

webinarWorld AIDS Day Clinical Trials Twitter Chat and an ‘HIV Clinical Trials: A Year in Review’ Webinar

Featuring presentations by Jim Maynard of the HIV Vaccine Trials Network, Jonathan Lucas of the HIV Prevention Trials Network and Clare Collins of the Microbicide Trials Network

WAD Clinical Trials Twitter Chat
Date: Wednesday November 19, 2014
Time: 11:00 am
Event Hashtag: #ClinicalTrialsChat

HIV Clinical Trials: A Year in Review Webinar
Date: Wednesday November 19, 2014
Time: 1:00 pm

Register here.

Friday ID conference: “Organized Crime, Kevin Bacon & Air Traffic: Lessons for HIV Prevention”

susanThis talk is a part of our friday morning CFAR/IGHID Friday ID Conference Series.

“Organized Crime, Kevin Bacon & Air Traffic: Lessons for HIV Prevention”

Susan Little, MD
University of California, San Diego (UCSD)

November 7, 2014
8:30 – 9:30 a.m.
1131 Bioinformatics
UNC Campus

Susan Little, M.D. is a Professor of Medicine in the Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). She conducts translational clinical research focused on the pathogenesis, prevention and treatment of acute and very recent HIV infection. She is the director of the Primary Infection Research Program at UCSD, working to evaluate the epidemiologic, behavioral, biologic, virologic, and host factors that contribute to HIV transmission. She has been heavily involved in the design of novel approaches to screen and identify acutely infected individuals, and use of molecular epidemiologic methods to infer and characterize HIV transmission networks. Current research is focused on the evaluation of treatment and prevention interventions directed to network hubs to reduce incident infections. She is actively involved in the training and mentoring of students, post-doctoral research fellows and junior faculty and is an active investigator in the UCSD AIDS Clinical Trials Group.

Special Note: This Friday Morning Conference event will be presented as an NCATEC training, and advanced registration is requested. For questions about registration or general questions about the NCATEC, please contact michele_bailey@med.unc.edu.

Register here